Nor'n Ireland

Northern Ireland: places, politics, histories, events, people and fries.

EAT: A ‘Bumper Fry’ (sausages, bacon, eggs, potato bread, soda bread, hash brown, beans, mushrooms and chips)

PLACE: Maggie May’s, Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Titanic Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Belfast: Local Tip

In Belfast, some people like to order their drink by colour rather than its brand name.

For example:

Green = Carlsberg

White = Lemonade

Bottle Blue = WKD

Pint Blue = Harp

Black = Guinness

…who knows why? But anyway, ”Here, giza pinda Green!”

In preparation for Street Art Exhibition, open from April 6th - The Ulster Museum, Belfast.

In preparation for Street Art Exhibition, open from April 6th - The Ulster Museum, Belfast.

From: The Ulster Museum, Belfast.

From: The Ulster Museum, Belfast.

"The red hand of Ulster was the emblem of the O’Neill’s of Tyrone from as early as the fourteenth century. The hand was inevitably red when impressed in sealing wax. What appears as a left hand on a seal matrix becomes a right hand in impressions.
The red hand is associated with modern-day Loyalism and the politics of ‘No Surrender’. But an open hand, in medieval terms, is a hand divorced from threat or weapon.”
[Taken from The Ulster Museum, Belfast]

"The red hand of Ulster was the emblem of the O’Neill’s of Tyrone from as early as the fourteenth century. The hand was inevitably red when impressed in sealing wax. What appears as a left hand on a seal matrix becomes a right hand in impressions.

The red hand is associated with modern-day Loyalism and the politics of ‘No Surrender’. But an open hand, in medieval terms, is a hand divorced from threat or weapon.”

[Taken from The Ulster Museum, Belfast]

[Taken from The Ulster Museum, Belfast]


"The period of Northern Ireland’s history from 1968 is usually referred to as ‘The Troubles’. Much of this period, because it is so recent and because it was so traumatic, is still painfully - often bitterly - remembered by those who were injured, their families and the families of those who died. In all, there were some 3,000 deaths, around 50,000 explosions and innumerable sectarian incidents.”
[Taken from The Ulster Museum, Belfast]

"The period of Northern Ireland’s history from 1968 is usually referred to as ‘The Troubles’. Much of this period, because it is so recent and because it was so traumatic, is still painfully - often bitterly - remembered by those who were injured, their families and the families of those who died. In all, there were some 3,000 deaths, around 50,000 explosions and innumerable sectarian incidents.”

[Taken from The Ulster Museum, Belfast]